Learn these beginning consonant sounds. Say the picture word and listen to the sound you hear at the beginning. Repeat this sound until you've learned it well. You need to know these sounds in order to decode (sound out) words.

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Voice Sounds   Click on the letter, name, and picture

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Yy is a special letter; sometimes it is a consonant and sometimes it is a vowel.
The "y" in the word yak is a consonant. (It is a voice consonant; its sound is audible.)

The vowels are a-e-i-o-u and sometimes y.

y functions as a vowel when it:

a) concludes a word which has no other vowel (my)
b) concludes words of more than one syllable (happy)
c) immediately follows another vowel (may).

In the combination ay, y serves as a vowel. When two vowels are together - the first has its long sound, the second is silent. Hence, our vowel rule:

When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking, (it says its name).
The second one does the walking, (it is silent).