Skill: long (o) spelling patterns (o-e) and (oe)

The “e” at the end of home is silent; it is a signal that sits at the end of the word. It tells the first vowel to say its name.
It is known as the magic "e" rule.

Read these words.

home image
bone hole robe stone
choke home rode stove
close hope rope those
cone nose rose tone
globe note slope vote
grove pole smoke zone

Recall the long vowel rule: When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking (it says its name), the second one does the walking (it is silent).

doe Joe roe toe
foe hoe tiptoe woe

 

Write the two long (o) spelling patterns in the words above.

 

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Can you think of some additional words with the spelling patterns (o-e, oe)?

 

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Dictation/Spelling Practice for (o-e, oe) words

 

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Read these sentences.

oboe image cast image

 

Create two or more sentences. Include some words that have the spelling pattern (o-e, oe). Illustrate one of your sentences on the back of the paper.

 

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Check your sentences. Did you begin each sentence with a capital letter? Did you add a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!) at the end of each sentence? Is your penmanship neat?

 

 

 

 

 

A number of frequently used words do not follow the general vowel rules, particularly o–e  (o consonant e words). I’m listing a few of these. These words are known as Sight Words.

come done dove glove gone love none some

One cannot “sound out” sight words according to their visual pattern. The word “come” appears to be a “magic e” word, therefore the “o” would have a long vowel sound. If pronounced according to the rule, it would sound like “comb” The common phonic generalizations (rules) learned in beginning reading cannot be applied to the pronunciation of sight words.